“If you change the way you look at things, the things you look at will change.” – Wayne Dyer

per·spec·tive
a particular attitude toward or way of regarding something; a point of view.

In my living room, I have this giant, comfy oversized chair with a matching ottoman and a nice, soft, luxurious blanket hanging over the back of the chair that I use to put over my legs. This is my favorite spot to sit, read, write, and watch TV. This has been my spot for the last year and I love it.

Well, today I told myself that I was going to change my perspective. I wanted to see things differently, so I sat on my couch instead of my favorite chair. As I sat there, praying and meditating, I noticed things I hadn’t paid attention to in a long time. As I looked out the window, I saw the vastness of the trees, my hummingbird feeder where two hummingbirds were fighting over the nectar. I saw all the beautiful flowers in full colorful bloom. I could see the feisty squirrels scampering from limb to limb.

As I was taking in all this beauty, I asked myself how many times do we become conditioned to the same old attitudes, the same way of thinking, seeing things the same old way, always having the same perspective.

Example: Monday morning rolls around and the first thing you say is, “OMG I can’t believe it’s Monday already, this sucks. I hate Mondays!” Well, guess what? Your Monday is going to suck.

What if on Monday morning, instead of dreading it, you say, “Man I’m so thankful I woke up this morning–it’s going to be a beautiful day. I’m so blessed to have a job.” Changes the scenario, doesn’t it?

Another example: your spouse gets upset because you spent too much money shopping and he has a discussion with you. You get very angry and you start yelling and naming off all the things he spends money on. You accuse him of trying to control you and not wanting you to be happy. The next thing you know, you aren’t speaking to each other and the energy in the room is so heavy and draining.

Maybe there are bills that are due that he’s worried about. Maybe he’s worried about retirement and your nest egg. What if you listened to your husband, told him you’re sorry, asked him if he’s worried and look at it from a totally different perspective?

That simple shift of perspective would change the whole dynamics of that conversation and would end on a positive note–and I’m sure a very grateful husband.

In other words, “Instead of complaining that the rose bush is full of thorns, be happy the thorn bush has roses.” ~Proverb